Mukogawa Women’s University
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  • About Mukogawa Women's University [Message from the Chancellor]

Message from the Chancellor

Nurturing Women Able to Contribute to Society

Chancellor Ryo OkawaraIn 1931, Kiichiro Koe, the chief school inspector of Hyogo Prefecture, and latterly the founder of Mukogawa Women’s University, travelled overseas to investigate the state of education in Europe at the time. His visits to middle schools in England, notably to Eton School, and to Oxford and Cambridge Universities, and his observations of the ambitious activities of the students receiving a humanistic education, left a deep impression. This exposure to English private school education inspired him to establish a similar school immediately upon his return to Japan, and in 1939 he founded Mukogawa Girls' High School on the educational ideals of ‘high intelligence, noble sentiments, lofty virtues'.

Subsequently, the academy was established, engaging in education and research focusing not only the humanities but also on the sciences to contribute to society through the development of women, and major efforts were expended in education and research, and developing an appropriate environment for education. Today, Mukogawa Women's University incorporates a nursery school and kindergarten, a middle school, a high school, a junior college, and a graduate school, with more than 13,000 students, and has grown into one of the few women's academies in Japan. Graduates of the academy number in excess of 170,000 students, and branches of the alumni association are established overseas as well.

In 2011, two new buildings were constructed. The Psychological Sciences Building was established as a center for research on problems of clinical psychology affecting children and the family, such as bullying, child abuse, school non-attendance, and domestic violence. The Nutritional Sciences Building was established for the training and education of National Registered Dietitians to support improvements in nutrition and diet of the elderly in the regions. The facility is designed to improve communications with the regions, and to return the benefits of education and research to society.

In the age of gender equality, opportunities for female participation are increasing, and women have a greater role in society. As we approach the 80th anniversary of its founding, the institution is responding to society's call for wider intellectual scope, and development of women with high ambitions.

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