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Lecture

Islamic tiles from the 12th to the 14th centuries

Date:Sunday, October 30, 2011, 16:00-16:40
Venue:West Hall, the Koshien Hall
Lecturer:Dr. Tomoko Masuya (Professor at Institute for Advanced Studies on Asia, the University of Tokyo)

バフチェシヒル大学日本文化研究センター

Dr. Tomoko Masuya, Professor at the Institute for Advanced Studies on Asia, the University of Tokyo

We held a lecture entitled “Islamic tiles from the 12th to the 14th centuries” inviting Dr. Tomoko Masuya, Professor at Institute for Advanced Studies on Asia, the University of Tokyo. The lecture was held in commemoration of the opening of the Architecture and Culture through the Silk Road Galleries. She had written descriptions of the collection of Islamic tiles in the galleries.

The lecture began with a commentary on the history of tiles in Islamic architectures up to the 12th century, including Glazed bricks, which were used in ancient Mesopotamia and ancient Iran (Persia) since BC, stucco used for architectural decoration in the Sassanid Persian Empire, Mosaic, which were mainly used for architectural decoration before the 7th or mid-8th century, luster-painted tiles in Iraq in the 9th century, luster-painted tiles in Egypt in the 11th century.

Then, tiles in the Islamic dynasty in the 12th to 14th centuries were introduced. Tile decoration developed during this period. Tile mosaic of Alhambra in the Nasrid dynasty (current Spain), glazed bricks and tiles used on the outer walls, mina'i tiles and underglaze-painted tiles used on the inner walls in the Sultanate of Rum (current Turkey and Syria), tiles in Ghaznavids (current Afghanistan) in the 12th century were also explained.

Lastly, tiles of the 12th to the 14th century Iran, which comprise the core of the collection, were introduced. Professor Masuya’s commentary was made from various perspectives such as decorative techniques of tiles, types of tiles used for interior wall (e.g. Dado tiles, Frieze tiles, Border tiles, Mihr?b tiles and Floor tiles), and inscriptions and pictures drawn on the tiles.

We appreciate the comprehensible lecture on Islamic tiles by the researcher actively at work. It was a valuable opportunity for us.

バフチェシヒル大学日本文化研究センター
The Lecture at West Hall